SP. 20


Instructor: Takako Tajima


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0

This project was to redesign Mac Arthur park into an a-hundred-year forest. Using the formal strategy of ramps, I graded the plan and separated the site into several layers, and then used the condition of the ramp to connect each layer. Take four basins as the center to develop a transition forest.


SP. 20


Instructor: Takako Tajima


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3

In this project, a successional 100 year urban forest on the theme of the words ‘Waves and Ripples’ is proposed for MacArthur Park, which is popular and used public park in the city.

With the use of sketch models made using various materials, the unique qualities, nature and tendencies of waves were studied and analyzed. The constant undulation, the crests and the fall and the idea of waves being a ripple effect, each one depending on the last one, were what inspired ad informed the design decisions further on.

The final design proposal finds itself influenced by the character of waves, not just in its form and topography but also in its ideological concept and planning. The theme of waves being temporal is what was found to resonate with landscape as well. The design then attempts to explore how a public urban park while serving the community can still be testimony to the constantly dynamic and temporal qualities of landscape.

Since, the park had to have a wetlands system designed within it, the idea was to make this natural system as visible as possible. The water thus follows a successional flow pattern filling each pond once the previous one is to full to finally then exit the park back into the stormwater drains. Within the design, there are many moments and instances where the user is made to come face to face with the temporal and seasonal quality of the park – some of the paths that would be used during the dry season, get inundated during storm events, in drier seasons one can walk at the base of some of the ponds, an entry to the park is made seasonal etc. The planting strategy and phasing of the park is designed to enhance these moments and effects, employing mainly native California species. The driving force is to make the user experience time and season by the simple experience of an everyday public park, while managing to have a blend of recreational, ecological and cultural values.


SP. 20


Instructor: Takako Tajima


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4

This project generates an urban forest on the site of Mac Arthur park, utilizing a system of braids and the depressions between them. This system slows and collects water to foster plant growth and manage storm water.


SP. 20


Instructor: Takako Tajima


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8

In this project, a successional urban forest on the theme of the word “quilt” is proposed for MacArthur Park, a 33-acre site in Los Angeles, CA.

The qualities of a quilt were explored through process models, examining the juxtaposition of materials, colors, and textures as well as the undulation of the fabric itself. Based on the final process model, each layer of overlapping polygons was assigned a growth condition (slow growing vs. fast-growing and long-lived vs. short-lived). Over 100 years, a successional forest develops in the form of a patchwork quilt, where quadrants emerge and fade based on the natural life cycles of the trees. Mass plantings of Californian native trees give a unique character to each patch.

Along patch borders, a series of decomposed granite paths offer visitors a multitude of experiences and paths of travel, like a jumble of modern pattes-d’oie. A wider, concrete loop provides fire access and a comfortable walking route while recalling the lake circuits that have been a prominent feature of MacArthur Park since its opening in 1890. Intimate unpaved trails cut through the patches. Retention and detention basins follow the geometry of the patches and filter stormwater from both the site and local watershed.


SP. 20


Instructor: Takako Tajima


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2

The project was to review and create an urban forest in MacArthur Park. Using sweep conditions as a concept, I started by playing with different sweep elements to generate the form. The main objective is that the sweep conditions were going to be differentiated based on different kind of contour signatures that eventually will create different environmental conditions and microclimates along the site.


SP. 20


Instructor: Takako Tajima


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4

The purpose of the project is to create an urban forest in MacArthur Park over the course of a century through plant succession. We began the process using sketch models, contour models and finally translating that topography to MacArthur Park. The topographic changes throughout the park determine the planting plan. High points will be planted with pioneer species, lower points with intermediate and the lowest points with climax community species.

The studio concerned itself with the area in and around MacArthur Park in the neighborhood just west of downtown Los Angeles. MacArthur Park is one of the oldest parks in the city in a neighborhood that has seen dramatic changes throughout its history – from an area of neglect, to an upscale neighborhood for the rich and powerful, to the birthplace of violent gangs, and now a vibrant neighborhood under intense gentrification pressures. The final project imagines a new topography for MacArthur Park that will support the cultivation of a new forest.

This course builds upon the skills acquired in ARCH 541a furthering the ability of students to think spatially and design at multiple scales. Students not only investigate physical conditions but also become familiar with the less tangible aspects of our urban environment – including but not limited to social, cultural, and economic issues – and how they effect the urban environment. Students develop their skills through a series of tasks that culminate in a comprehensive proposal for a strategic urban intervention.